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20130115
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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
laying his left hand on two bibles -- one owned by abraham lincoln and the other owned by dr. martin luther king, jr. afterward, obama will deliver a speech laying out his plans for the next four years. the nro ceremony will include music from singers james taylor, beyoncÉ, and others which will carry live during our extended five-our inauguration special. after our regular broadcast ends, we will continue to bring you coverage until 1:00 p.m. eastern standard time, including the swearing in ceremony. some stations will run the whole five our special, for others you can go to democracynow.org. this year, the inauguration also comes on the federal holiday in honor of dr. martin luther king, jr., who delivered his "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago, not far from here at the lincoln memorial. later in our special coverage, we will air excerpts of some of dr. king's less often played speeches, including "beyond vietnam." why he opposed the war in vietnam. but first, we turn to some of the voices of hope and resistance from sunday night's piece ball. not affiliated with any political p
address in history is the second inaugural address which is lincoln which some people say surpasses the gettysburg address. it's the best lay sermon no history. >> and dr. jill bide ep is accompanied by honey alexander, the wife of senator lamar alexander. and by debby boehner, wife of house speaker john boehner. sorry to interrupt you there. >> more recently, you may disagree with the content and the tone but no one will dispute the fact that george w. bush was aiming for the bleachers with his second inaugural with what he called his freedom speech which is -- in terms of projecting american force, moral and military around the world in the wake of 9/11 and the doctrine of preemptive military action. >> you knows the reference to lincoln, we talk about being in a divided america now. in many ways we are politically. but you think about lincoln and that inauguration, both of his, it was a different level. >> different level all together. he is involved in the conflict where half a million people would be killed, the end of channeled slavery. a lot is at stake. we're fighting now bu
of texas. he can rise above everyday politics and speak to history. lincoln did in the 1865, f.d.r. in 1937, now it's obama's chance." did he do that? >> yeah, i think he did it pretty well. this wasn't lincoln 1865 but we haven't had one since. the closest was roosevelt 1937. we're not likely to see that, charlie. i thought he did whatrand said he should do. i appreciate what mark is saying but i think this is not a programmatic speech. this is not a speech where you talk about here's my four-point jobs program. it's a speech about vision and i thought he gave a good sense of where he wanted the country to be i think it clearly was a progressive democratic speech. in f you read reagan's in 1985 it was a conservative republican speech. and a as for those who say -- i watched fox news who say he didn't offer olive branches or reach across the table to try to encourage birtisanship, i would note 16 years ago bill clinton in his second inaugural said that you have sent a democratic president and a republican congress back to washington, you didn't send us back to engage in bickering and partis
by chance. when lincoln creates -- lincoln creates some really great was but one of the first words he thought about secession. he said that secession is the sugar coating, the impact of this country. lincoln when he first used sugarcoated, the printers of the united states comes to lincoln and said we cannot put this in the official record, the word sugarcoated. and lincoln says i can't imagine any american not knowing what you're saying. lincoln was also, again i'm going back to william safire's influence, one of the first uses of cool, not innocent of temperature but in the sense of being callous, he said, something he said that was cool. that was callous. it was a behavioral thing. so again, those are, a word like cool. obama could come up with a new name of cool. that's another thing. one word and you give it different many. as i said with all these different meanings. and how i did this was i did a lot of reading and i get a lot of use of huge proprietary databases at the library of congress. 19th century database where you can find the original document in which 1807 when jeffer
one. >> of course, there was lincoln's second inaugural where he talked about the wounds of the nation. we know that the president has been working on this president for weeks and major garrett, our chief white house correspondent, is at the white house this morning with a little bit of insight on what we might hear today. >> well, good morning, scott. those closest to the president tell us this speech is in the moment and it's going to talk, they hope, credibly, believably about responsibilities ahead. and the prospect for not only bipartisan compromise, and things that didn't seem achievable four years ago. it might be worth reminding us ourselves how the president ended first inaugural address four years ago. scott, the president talked about america being in the midst of a winter of our hardship and he urged the nation to brave icy currents and to endure whatever storms may come. there was a sense of forboding then, a sense of crisis, both economic and otherwise, that white house advisers that he feels is no longer as present now as it was then. so that's part of the optimistic not
lincoln. when harry truman was worrying about firing mcarthur, he's reading about mcclellan, what did lincoln do about mcclellan. you think about your own life, learn from your own experiences. he will have learned from this fist term an enormous set of things to take with him to the second term, strengthed and weaknesses. but you can learn from all these guys before you, like learning from your grandparents and great grandparents. great when a president cares about history. >> give me a measure, michael, of how much this president is attuned to history, how much it plays a part of his lady life. i know i've read he tries to find up to three hours a day and night between 9:00 and midnight to read. >> he is above all a writer, so not surprising given what this is his day job is. but, you know, i think the most revealing thing was just after the election he gave that press conference and was asked about second terms. you remember? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term ove
discrimination a crime. it was a very, very -- probably the most important advance since lincoln signed the emancipation proclaimation, and during that year, if johnson was mr. inside, and some outside, because he gave some inspirational speeches -- king kept the pressure on. whenever he thought that the congress was going to falter, that they couldn't beat a southern filibuster, king went to jail, and he refused to let people forget what this was all about. i'd like to concentrate on one particular period, because we have an anniversary coming up today, and i think looking at johnson and king during the struggle over the voting rights act in 1965, illustrates as well as anything the brilliance of both these men, the difficulty of their task, and their multidimensional leadership. the most important aspect of -- one of the most important aspects of which was the uncanny ability of both johnson and king to seize opportunity. they knew when to strike. on january 15, 1965, president johnson called martin luther king to congratulate him on his 36th birthday. listen to a little bit of what t
crisis. we talked about abraham lincoln's second inaugural while the civil war was still going on. we talk about f.d.r.'s "we have nothing to fear." the great depression was on and unemployment with such staggeringly high numbers so this is a time where people have felt improvement since president obama came? we have to remember the crash of the economy stock market in such terrible shape. it's been a progressive incrementalism. but i have to say this speech is part of a progressive tradition of a theodore roosevelt speech in kansas where barack obama in 1911 when -- in 2011 he went and if you read the t.r. speech "the new nationalism" you'll find hit in the speech he gave today. you'll find it at f.d.r.'s second inaugural and in many of martin luther king's speeches. people talk about kennedy's inaugural about swords and switchbacks. it's a technique that worked brilliantly for john f. kennedy but i think the president had caught the aura of dr. king today quite well. >> pelley: and this day being inauguration day and martin luther king day all at the same time. doug, thanks very muc
for being with us. the most memorable second term address was by abraham lincoln. guest: people think that it outranked the gettysburg address. i would say it is the greatest lay sermon delivered in america. anyone who questioned his spirituality, read the second inaugural. it is a remarkable address. it is not a celebratory speech. at that point, the war is almost over. the most obvious thing to do would be some congratulations. host: with malice toward none. guest: that is the magnanimous side. until the crime of human slavery was removed from the american landscape, the united states would not be right with god. it is an extraordinarily spiritual address. lincoln was looking ahead to reconstruction. host: this morning in the "new york times," the historian one of a number of people offering advice for the president's second speech. guest: i would not offer advice to the president. the second inaugural is one of the more inaugurable addresses. i see a country one-third ill clothed, ill fed. host: as the author of the book "patriarch," he delivered the first second inaugural address.
-- was a terrible -- he's kind of like lincoln in a way -- are you for slavery or are you not? because he's trying to keep the border states in line. he was terrified that if he ceded the black delegation that the white democrats from kentucky and tennessee and the other border states would walk out, and that's what -- he was pretending that he didn't have anything to do with it, but he was consumed by no other issue, and putting that together is an amazing story -- or chapter, i think, in our american history about the sensitivity of this issue at this time. c-span: but when he came up to the white house, he didn't have a meeting scheduled with lyndon johnson and he was supposed to meet with hubert humphrey. >> guest: right. c-span: and there was a lot of maneuvering around. >> guest: i'm sorry. you're talking about -- this is at selma. this is at sali in february of 1965. dr. king can out of jail in sali and announced in depression, he came out of jail and his aides said you can't just come out of jail. you have to have a purpose for coming out of jail. and he said i'm tired. i'm depressed. i've
was issued by president abraham lincoln, january 1, 1863. one of the most influential documents that declared all persons held as slaves within the confederate territory are here for and henceforth held free. i just want to go on record publicly acknowledging 150 years. that is quite an accomplishment. today's actually the 84th anniversary of doctor martin luther king's birth. many people know who doctor king was, a clergyman, activist, husband, father, the most prominent promoter of nonviolence and civil disobedience; he received the nobel peace prize in 1964 in recognition of his nonviolence. only we discussing assault weapons ban ammunitions but acknowledging that today would have been doctor martin luther king's 84th birthday, a very prolific activist. i would like to recognize and former city employee and decorated soldier mr. hillyer terry, born june 4, 1923. while attending college he was drafted to serve in world war ii; he served the united states army from 1943 to 1946 where he received an honorable discharge; he was awarded the american theater campaign medal; the eaim ca
to be photographed. during lincoln's second inaugural was the first to have african americans to take part. president george w. bush became the nation's 43rd president on january 20, 2001 after defeating al gore that ended in a supreme court decision in december of that year. the enaugust ration was attended by 3,000 people. this is about a 15 minutes. [applause] >> are you ready to take the oath? i, george walker bush do solemnly swear, that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states. and will to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states. so help me god. congratulations. [applause] ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states, george w. bush. [applause] >> president clinton, distinguished guests and my fellow citizens, the peaceful transfer of authority is rare in history, yet common in our country. with a simple oath, we affirm old traditions and make new beginnings. as i begin, i thank president clinton for his service to our nation. [applause] and i thank vice president gore for a contest co
meeting george washington in his underpants or abraham lincoln. at least for my students at rutgers university, martin luther king, that is really the past back there with washington and lincoln or something, all of american history before they were born is ancient history to them. there he is in white boxer shorts and i go in and we americans are in formal. he was taking a nap which i understood perfectly. i began to talk to him about we have got to do something about the media because if i found you they will find you and drive you crazy and you want to take it easy today. i want to help you take it easy today. and here is what i recommend. i recommend that i let the press attache set up a press conference of only half an hour in the ballroom of the hotel limited to half an hour. i will do the interpreting and he will set it up for an hour from now. i understand you are just here to see the town but if we don't do that, the paparrazzi will drive us crazy so if we don't do this and say it is limited to that, and he said okay so i called the embassy and he set it up. later on it was
"struggle" means. you may ahve heard about the two bibles he used, the lincoln bible and the mlk bible. should we care what book the oath is sworn upon? we go to san antonio, texas. liz is on the republican line. guest: i have been a democrat voter for 53 and i decided with everything i saw, i changed to republican. there are a lot o fissues i don't believe in is if it is in your heart you want to make a change -- you stand under the flag and say i am an american no matter once and i will do my best as a citizen, as a person that wants the best for the country and not just say one thing and expect handouts and expect -- all these kinds of changes. salute the flag -- my husband was in the military. i am an american patriot but when yo useu see things people vote for to get that vote, are you going to really stand and put a flag -- every day of my life i've had a flag in front of my home and i will never stop having that flag. and i would like to know how many of those people that are going to get helped with -- will stand under that flag and truly believe in the flag in which we should
with his eloquence. and then, beyond the reflecting pool, the dignified columns of the lincoln memorial. whoever would understand in his heart the meaning of america will find it in the life of abraham lincoln. beyond those monuments to heroism is the potomac river, and on the far shore the sloping hills of arlington national cemetery, with its row upon row of simple white markers bearing crosses or stars of david. they add up to only a tiny fraction of the price that has been paid for our freedom. each one of those markers is a monument to the kind of hero i spoke of earlier. their lives ended in places called belleau wood, the argonne, omaha beach, salerno, and halfway around the world on guadalcanal, tarawa, pork chop hill, the chosin reservoir, and in a hundred rice paddies and jungles of a place called vietnam. under one such marker lies a young man, martin treptow, who left his job in a small town barbershop in 1917 to go to france with the famed rainbow division. there, on the western front, he was killed trying to carry a message between battalions under heavy artillery fire. we
off the stage. >> and just enjoyed killing kennedy as much as killing lyincol lincoln. as a former social studies teacher, i marvel at how alive you make them. and the tip of the day. we the people love nature. we like to hunt and fish hike and camp that kind of stuff. but, be very careful. >> oh my gosh! oh, baby, get he him, baby, oh! oh! oh hold on, baby, hold on! hold on, oh! >> jaws 5. that first was a tar pin, went up and got him. he wasn't fishing. the tar pin got away and most likely yucking it up with his friends. if you're in the water, on the water, in the forest, be ultra aware of what's going onment one time i was snorkeling in the bahamas all of a sudden 200 yards out to sea, head today cuba without a visa, a current got me and i'm a big guy. and right out of there! i was lucky somebody picked me up in a boat or i'd still be in the caribbean. underwater, always nature is
him from a distance. i try tried to get as close as i could so i got to the foot of the lincoln memorial but the notion of this 19-year-old that i would actually shake hands with him, that would have been the thrill of my life. i only saw his. >> twice and both times i saw as a member of the crowd. he came to ucla when i was a student there and spoke so that was the other time in 1965, something like that. >> host: how did that impact you on the way home? you have this long journey on the way home. >> guest: i didn't have a right back. i didn't tell my parents i was coming and i had a bus ticket that only went back to indianapolis. so then i just had to hitchhike and i hitchhiked across the country. >> host: were you scared? >> guest: of course i was but his 19-year-old you can do anything. >> host: you think you're invincible. how did that speech that day impact you on how stokely was trying to influence you? you talk to stokely afterwards. >> guest: well know, before. not afterwards. probably three years before i talk to him and by that time he had become -- in 1963 he was not
of the lincoln memorial but the notion as a 19-year-old that i would even shake hands with him, that could have been the thrill of my life. i saw him speak twice and both times i saw him as a member of the crowd. it was the other time maybe 1965, something like that. >> host: how did that impact you on the way home? >> guest: i didn't tell my parents i was coming and i have a bus tickets that went back to indianapolis so then i just had to hitchhike and i just hiked across the country. >> host: were you scared? >> guest: as the 19-year-old you think that you can do anything. >> host: how the hearing dr. king's speech that the impact you on how stokely was trying to influence you? because you talk to him after. >> guest: before, not after. it was probably three years before i talked to him again. by that time he had become -- in 1963 he wasn't a well-known figure. 1966 he had black power so that is the next time we got back in touch with each other again and from that point on i stay in touch with him for the rest of his life. >> host: we are going to talk about him more because stokely carmicha
. >> host: how close? >> guest: as close as i could but i got to the floods of the lincoln memorial but the notion as a 19 year-old that i would even shake hands with him would have been the thrill of my life. those times he was a member of a crowd. he came to ucla when i was a student and that was the other time. maybe 1965. >> host: how does this impact you on the way home? >> i did not tell my parents i was coming and went back to indianapolis. i had to hitchhike. >> host: were you scared -- were you scared? >> guest: of course. but at 19 you think your in principle. >> host: with his influence did you talk to him? >> it was maybe three years before i talked with him again. 1963 he was not a well-known public figure but 1966 was african black power. that is when we got in touch with each other again then stayed in touch the rest of his life. >> host: has one of my heroes as well as malcolm x i was more in an agreement with of later malcolm x and stokely carmichael but as an older i appreciate the teton and -- dr. king tactics. he has the monument. you had misgivings of time magaz
ago, that dr. king stood on the steps of the lincoln memorial and said i have a dream. >> of course, this was actually the fourth time that president obama has taken the oath of office. let's bring in our panel, van jones, cnn contributor who served as president obama's green jobs adviser in 2009. sally quinn, margaret hoover, republican consultant, cornell belcher, democratic strategist who served fas a pollster for president obama's 2012 re-election team. i wonder how you think this anniversary, this martin luther king day, informed and was infused throughout president obama's remarks today. >> i'll go back to even when he was senator obama. he always talked about, he also understood the gravity and talked about, i stand on the shoulders of the great men and women of the civil right era who made this possible. even early on, many of the civil rights leaders early on in the primary process were with hillary clinton and it took a while for them to trust him and know who he was. and he used a lot of that conversation saying, look, because of you all, i am possible. and i remember we
"lincoln." >> state dinners. >> the majority leader's office called later and said, yeah, we got the invitation that afternoon, four hours beforehand. but you invite congressmen and senators over, one on one, they'll come. >> there is an upside to cooperation. not every battle is one of opposition. begin to reframe the image of the party with the rest of the country, number one. at the end of the day, that's what people want to see, you working with the administration. to joe's point, you don't have to agree with everything, but you can at least stand there and show that we're trying to make the effort. so when you have the noise come out about, well, we want to block him at every turn, that plays on the psyche of the american people. >> mike, what'ses in it f in it republicans? well, the republicans' backs are against the wall. they owned the house of representatives. they have a midterm election in 2014. for those republicans saying, oh, well, we always win midterm electio elections, no, you don't. two elections ago, we get routed by nancy pelosi. >> let's get to a break. we ha
to go with lincoln's second inaugural. >> awesome. >> 1865. >> i remember that. it was a good one. >> as i said, the video footage is a little grainy. the audio wasn't there. i was thinking of something else. there's a moment i think is kind of worth sharing because it's rare to encapsulate the failure of a presidency in to one day, the inaugural day. inauguration day. i would say that would be jimmy carter. whatever you think of jimmy carter's politics, the ideology, it wasn't a very successful presidency. and the roots of it sort of evident on the day of the inauguration for two reasons. first, his staff kind of bungled the, you know, showing proper deference to the speaker of the house, tip o'neill, for instance. crucially important guy for getting the carter program through congress. he was miffed because he wasn't treated well with tickets to inaugural festivities and balls and that sort of thing. the leadership of the democratic party in congress, carter won the nomination in an end and around them understanding the new primary rules before they did. he didn't show proper de
and misfortune. >> progressives are over the moon. msnbc's chris matthews gushed there's so much of lincoln in obama's speech, with one exception. lincoln's second inaugural speech included this famous line "with malice toward none, with charity for all, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation's wounds." arguably there was little of that in obama's speech, no extended talk of working together, of bipartisanship, but there was a not so veiled slam at republican paul ryan, congressional budget chairman and former vice presidential candidate who once said 60% of americans are takers because they take more in government benefits than they pay in. and about those benefits, mr. president? >> they do not make us a nation of takers, they free us to take the risks that make this country great. >> so the talkback question for you this morning, obama's speech, what was your takeaway, facebook.com/carolcnn, or tweet me @carolcnn. your responses later this hour. i'll be right back. a hybrid? most are just no fun to drive. now, here's one that will make you feel alive. meet t
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)